Tag Archives: UNC Health Care System

Sunday in Musanze

St. John the Baptist Cathedral

St. John the Baptist Cathedral

Today we are in Musanze (formerly known as Ruhengeri).

We went to the early service (in English) at St. John the Baptist Cathedral. The Anglican service of Morning Prayer was very familiar, and all the songs were ones we knew. There were some other Americans and other non-Rwandans there as well.

After a break, I went back for a portion of the main service, which is in Kinyarwandan, the national language here. I did not understand a single word ? but the vibrant, enthusiastic service was really inspiring.

I was struck by how many young people there were ? in both services, lots of young adults and children. And especially young adult men ? noticeably different from many American churches, that lack them.

Kigali and Gisenyi

Will with people we met on the road

Will with people we met along the roadside

Today was a very good day.

We did several things to get settled ? changed money, got cheap cell phones, got our passes for the mountain gorilla tour (which we will do in a couple of days).

Then we went to the Kigali Genocide Memorial. It tells the incredible story of the 1994 genocide in very effective and moving terms. It is really impossible to do it justice in a short blog posting, but this country has been through horrific trauma, and is now making amazing progress in reconciliation and development.

Then we drove almost three hours to Gisenyi, which is on the shores of Lake Kivu, a huge, beautiful lake. There are a number of resort hotels there, and we went to a very nice one, and had a late lunch. It was magnificent — we sat overlooking the lake as we ate.

We are now in Musanze, where we will spend the next two nights. The town used to be called Ruhengeri.

Our day starts tomorrow with the early English service at the Anglican Cathedral, and then we will spend the rest of the day relaxing. The guesthouse has a pool and the weather here is great.

Then we set out early on Monday to see the gorillas.

Arrived in Rwanda

On the way here via Brussels, we got to spend an unplanned extra day in Belgium. Our plane flight was cancelled, and we had to wait a day for it to go.

Everyone was very kind to us ? they put us up in a hotel at the Brussels Airport, and served us great food.

We got to visit with several of our fellow pilgrims to Rwanda ? a couple from Little Rock on their way to visit their daughter who is working for an non-profit group in Rwanda, three college students who are going there to do volunteer work with another group for several weeks, a lady going home to Congo (she lives a five hour bus ride from Kigali, Rwanda), and an AIDS researcher who works in Rwanda. It turns out we know lots of people in common.

We arrived after dark this evening ? so have not yet seen much, but it is clearly hilly. After all, Rwanda is known as the Land of a Thousand Hills.
Tomorrow we visit the main genocide memorial and then leave the capital city to visit some of the outlying areas.

En route to Rwanda

Greetings from Brussels ? our son, Will, and I are on our way to Rwanda for a long-planned visit.

This will be the fourth of our international visits together, in which we combine our interest in global health with an effort to learn more about the world ? especially those parts which are far away from Chapel Hill.

Will Roper in the Brussels Airport

Will Roper in the Brussels Airport

In 2007, Will and I went to South Africa, Malawi and Zambia. We focused especially on the UNC Institute for Global Health and Infectious Disease work that has long been done in Malawi. We learned a lot, and Will got to work in an AIDS orphanage.

In 2008, he and I went to China, where we again met with UNC collaborators, particularly in the China CDC. And we got to take in some of the Beijing Olympics!

In 2009, Will and I went to Peru, with Drs. Luis Diaz and Doug Morgan, and we saw first-hand the work that they and colleagues are doing to advance our understanding of health and disease. This has direct relevance to our efforts in Latino Health in North Carolina. And we got to see Machu Picchu too!

This year it's Rwanda ? a small country in east central Africa ? with a troubled past, but an exciting present and future. The 1994 genocide in Rwanda is a major part of the history of the country, and we will be visiting genocide memorials and learning of the horror of what happened 16 years ago.

But we will also be learning of the widespread reconciliation work that seems to be bearing much fruit, and the rapid development of the country and its economy.

UNC does not yet have global health work in Rwanda, but I will be visiting with leaders in the Ministry of Health, and in the hospitals and medical school. I look forward to learning much about what others are doing in Rwanda, and to thinking about the further opportunities.

In addition, our church in Chapel Hill has a partnership with the Anglican Church in Rwanda, and our sister parish is St. Paul's Cathedral in Butare, Rwanda. I will be visiting with church leaders there and elsewhere in Rwanda.

All in all, we have much to learn and experience. It promises to be a great trip!

Much more to come.

Reform stays on track

Yesterday at the White House a group of representatives from various sectors of the health care industry met with President Obama to offer their long-term support for health care reform. Hospitals and physicians were there, as well as the health insurance, pharmaceutical industries and organized labor.

The meeting was noteworthy in that it keeps this very important discussion atop the national agenda and includes major stakeholders in health care. As the President himself said that some of the groups present yesterday had opposed previous attempts at reform. They now support it. That demonstrates that reform efforts this year are worth paying attention to organizations and special interests are now willing to put aside their differences to help find a solution.

While it is doubtful that a voluntary approach will result in dramatic cost reductions, the gathering of this group at the White House does signify the importance of inclusion and stake holder involvement. Our complicated, complex and costly health care system will, however, require much more. We still need a massive overhaul to keep costs in check, expand access and ensure quality and safety.

President Obama told the American public that reforming health care is crucial to stabilizing and growing our economy. I couldn't agree more. As I said most recently at the White House regional health reform forum in Greensboro, N.C., on March 31, we do not need to throw more money at the problem. The Obama Administration and the Office of Health Reform are on the right track. Our country needs to provide universal coverage, so that everyone has full access to the health care system. We need to invest in better IT systems that work more efficiently and effectively. We need to continue funding research to combat disease (and control costs). And, we can do all of this while improving quality.

We, as a nation, need to have the courage and fortitude to make reform a reality.