Tag Archives: National University of Rwanda

A few more photos

I’m sending a few more photos of our trip while we are waiting in the Brussels Airport.

This is of Will making bricks at the Dufatanye Co-op.
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Will with the pitcher he made at the Co-op.
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The entrance to the faculty of medicine (the med school) at the National University of Rwanda in Butare.

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The rector of NUR (our chancellor's counterpart), Prof. Silas Lwakabamba

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Bishop Nathan Gasatura, his wife, Florence, their son, Daniel, and Will and me, in their home

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St. Paul's Cathedral, Butare

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Godfrey Kalema, his wife, Diane, a student, Theonest (with the UNC hat I gave him!) and Will, near the Dufatanye Co-op

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John, who drove us all over Rwanda, and Will ? in the Kigali Airport, just before we left

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About to leave for home

This may be my last blog entry written from Rwanda. It has been a simply fabulous trip in every respect.

Will and I are the Hotel des Mille Collines, made famous by the film, Hotel Rwanda. It is a very nice upscale hotel. We stopped here because we are early for the airport, and we are using the WiFi connection here for a couple of hours.

For the past two days I have been in Butare, which is the home of the National University of Rwanda. It is a university town ? think the Chapel Hill of Rwanda.

It is also home for St. Paul's Cathedral, the main Anglican church in the diocese of Butare. It is the sister congregation for our church back in Chapel Hill.

I visited with Bishop Nathan Gasatura and his wife Florence ? whom I first met when they were visiting Chapel Hill about a year and a half ago. They are very warm and engaging people. He has long been a church and NGO leader, and she is a nurse. Florence got her masters in nursing in Scotland several years ago. When she was in Chapel Hill recently, she toured the North Carolina Cancer Hospital.

Florence took me around the medical school ? and I was also hosted by the vice dean. I had met the dean in Kigali last week. We saw the entire complex ? and I am quite impressed with what they do with limited resources.

We also visited the teaching hospital in Butare, which is known by its French acronym CHUB. It is about 500 beds ? and, again, I was very impressed with what they are doing. A major challenge for them is physician recruitment and retention, especially for specialists. For example, they told me there are no oncologists in the nation of Rwanda, and only a hand full of orthopedists, ophthalmologists, ENTs, etc.

Yesterday afternoon Will came back from his day at the Dufatanye Co-op, dirty, sweaty and tired, but very happy ? he has some great pictures that they took of him making bricks! He also made a clay pot ? like he learned to do in his ceramics class at Wingate University! He says they were fascinated with his making it.

Last evening we ate at Nathan and Florence's house ? it was a delicious meal of traditional Rwandese food. The dish I've grown to love is rice with what we would call English peas and carrots, with a sauce poured over it that looks like thin tomato soup. It is very tasty and filling.

I think I've lost a few pounds on this trip ? because I'm eating good food but not many snacks.

I really feel great.

Today I visited a bit with the leaders at St. Paul's Cathedral and then we started back to Kigali.

We stopped en route at Nyanza, to say thanks and farewell to Godfrey and Diane, his wife, at the Dufatanye Co-op. They gave us some gifts to take back, Rwandan crafts.

So … A few hours from now we hope to be on the plane headed home.

This has been a wonderful experience.

I will be able to post some pictures in a day or so.

Stay tuned.

The NUR Med School and the CDC

Today I had a very helpful meeting with Dr. Patrick Kyamanywa, the dean of the Faculty of Medicine of the National University of Rwanda. The med school is in Butare, where I will be in a few days, but he and I met in Kigali.

Patrick is a surgeon, with an active medical practice, who is now the acting dean of the med school. We shared insights about the opportunities and challenges of managing a school of medicine at a public university. He is very much a leader in the health sector of Rwanda, and works closely with the Minister of Health and others.

From him, as from others I have met, I gained important insights about Rwanda ? its past, present and future. He is a very impressive person in every respect.

Lunch with CDC Rwanda team

Lunch with CDC Rwanda team


Later I went to the US Embassy, where I met with the CDC team based there. About 30 CDC employees are assigned to Rwanda, and I got the chance to have lunch with a number of them, especially the Country Director for CDC-Rwanda, Dr. Pratima Raghunathan. She is a former EIS officer, who has been with CDC for more than ten years in a number of different assignments. She has been in Rwanda for two years.

CDC's global health mission has grown and developed very substantially since the time I was director (1990-93). In those days we had a global focus, and world-wide reach and impact, but it is now so much greater. With PEPFAR (The President's Emergency Fund for AIDS/HIV Relief) and other US government programs, CDC now has many more people and much more resources on the ground around the world, including here in Rwanda.

Ambassador Stuart Symington

Ambassador Stuart Symington

I was also able to see the US Ambassador, Stuart Symington, and to visit briefly with him. I am very proud of what CDC and the US Government more generally are doing in Rwanda.